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It’s all finished! - Boggioli - Quality Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil

There has been a break in communication owing to the fact that we were involved in the olive harvest. This year has been particularly good crop, and we are very pleased.

We are happy to have a post written by Robin Ellis, whose recent book Mediterranean Vegetarian Cooking (already reprinted – terrific!) was featured a few weeks ago. He and his wife Meredith have visited us several times during the olive harvest, and this is his recollection of one of their visits.

Today is the first day of the olive harvest at Boggioli high in the Tuscan Hills and we are guests here to help–in principal! We are awoken by a faint chugger-chugger of a tractor engine–it’s 7.40am and daylight is struggling to establish itself. The tractor and its trailer are driven by Peter who will work tirelessly with the other four pickers for the next 10 days–depending on the weather–to strip the farm’s thousand-plus trees of their beautiful purple-green olives and transport them to the frantoio (the olive mill) to be processed miraculously into green gold liquid: olive oil!  

The team of five works a long day. From eight in the morning until five as the daylight fades, with an hour for a snack lunch. They work at the trees with long electric rakes, lifting them high and stroking lightly downwards through the branches to bring the olives tumbling through the leaves onto the wide supple nets spread out on the ground. Each man carries a battery on his back, that powers the rake. It’s tough, steady work.

When a tree has yielded all its treasure, the nets beneath are carefully drawn together in a motion that guides the little runaway olives into piles. These piles are then distributed between colourful plastic crates, full of vents to keep the fruit aerated. These crates are then transported to the mill the next day.

Robin at work

Driving through the olive groves that stretch away down the valley you still see more traditional methods in use with wooden ladders pitched against the trees and families harvesting their precious fruit by hand.

Ah yes, our job is to sort the debris of leaves and small branches from the olives while avoiding stepping on and squashing them. Not so arduous but a useful part of the day’s work, we tell ourselves.

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Thank you, Robin. And so the oil is now safely stored in our stainless steel containers and protected by nitrogen to prevent oxidation, the end of the process. Time to start selling it!