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More about Oil - Boggioli - Quality Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil

This is our first guest post, and we are grateful to David Lewis for his contribution. David is the founder of Kitchen Ambition, a resource site for home chefs and those in pursuit of the perfect kitchen. He is also very much interested in the raw materials that chefs require. Here is what he has to say about the quality of olive oil.

David Lewis – Kitchen Ambition


I am the creator of Kitchen Ambition, and have been cooking seriously for about 10 years. Originally, I’m from the American South. Gathering with family and friends around the dinner table has been a tradition since I was young, but my interest in the kitchen didn’t actually begin until I left home in my 20s.
 
In my family, olive oil always represented quality cooking. Unfortunately, we didn’t have the background to understand that not all olive oil is created equal. After all, the average American consumes about 20x less olive oil than in many Mediterranean countries.
 
At the beginning of the last decade, an American university published a report that ⅔ of “extra virgin” olive oils sold in the States were defective. It dawned on me that I had no concept of what made an oil “defective” in the first place or how to distinguish it from the good stuff.
 
In the years that followed, I’ve learned that much of finding a great oil depends on your individual sense of taste. At the same time, there are a few underlying principles worth knowing.
 
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is the gold standard. It has the lowest acidity of any virgin oil, and should be free of flavor defects at the time it is bottled. EVOO is not cut with seed oils or refined. It is picked and pulled from the first processing of a new harvest, making it rich in good fats and antioxidants.
 
Fresh oil is the best oil. EVOO remains good for about two years after harvest. Most labels now mark the harvest or “best by” date. Once opened, it’s best to use a bottle within about 3 months. Exposure to light, heat, and oxygen cause olive oil to go bad over time.
 
Use it or lose it. Many people have a habit of saving “good” oil for a special occasion or using it sparingly. Unfortunately, you lose out on a lot of flavor this way. And as your bottle ages the healthy fats in fresh olive oil become damaged and less beneficial.
 
These principles have served me well in the journey of developing my palette. They’re a great jumping off point for anybody beginning to search for the best ingredients and flavors.

Thank you, David. I am sure that our readers will find this very useful information.